Category: DIY Boating

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When she won’t start

When she won’t start

We’ve all experienced that sinking feeling at the end of a day’s boating when you turn the key and are rewarded with a faint click. Before you call Coastguard, there are a few other options.

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Cooking with diesel

Cooking with diesel

For many years the humble LPG cooker’s been a popular cooking option for small and medium-sized boats, caravans and RVs. Economical and simple to use, it’s regarded as the best option when mains-powered appliances aren’t an option. But is it?

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Mason Clipper 23 resto

Mason Clipper 23 resto

Whangamata-based master craftsman Harry Nordberg has resuscitated a 1962 Mason Clipper 23 – giving the 57-year-old dame the cosmetic surgery she needed and deserved, writes Roger Mills. This boat has been restored for a client in Queenstown, and I caught up with Harry just before she was shipped south to her new owner. His involvement...

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Prodigal clinker

Prodigal clinker

An improbable re-acquaintance with a long-lost Jomo Craft clinker dinghy kindles plenty of memories for George Empson – and fires the flame for the painstaking restoration of a derelict sister ship. My life first intersected with the clinker dinghy in the late 1950s, when my father bought her from the then New Zealand Electricity Department...

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Failing potency

Failing potency

In last month’s issue I explored the ‘disease’ that afflicts diesel-powered boats – the dreaded diesel bug. Owners of petrol-powered vessels have no such problems. But they DO have their own unique problem – stale petrol.

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Dealing with argy-bargy

Dealing with argy-bargy

Most owners accept the importance of protecting their pride and joy from damage caused when tying up to docks, wharves and other boats. There’s more to the humble fender than meets the eye. The air-filled fender is by far the most popular type of protection for boats. Generally comprising a soft but very tough, PVC...

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The prop’s gone AWOL

The prop’s gone AWOL

On a recent scallop-gathering trip out at the Coromandel, all went well until a diver noticed that one of the boat’s drive shafts looked a bit bare – the prop was missing. How did that happen?